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If you liked this comic about usability, you’ll also like…

July 4th, 2005 by Hans Bjordahl :: see related comic

Ok/Cancel. If you haven’t checked it out yet, do. It’s a weekly must-read for usability professionals, human-computer interaction (HCI) geeks and anyone interested in interface design.

It’s also our “sister comic” on the Off Panel system, which is the framework for publishing both Bug Bash and Ok/Cancel. More comics will follow. And yes, there is some method to this madness.

Tom Chi and Kevin Cheng, the co-conspirators behind both Ok/Cancel and Off Panel, have some frightfully sharp ideas about the untapped potential of comics on the Web. I can’t reveal any specifics about what’s the cause of all the sawing and hammering noises coming out of the Off Panel workshop, but can say the second I realized where they wanted to take this train, I leapt at the chance to buy a ticket. If you’re interested in the history, present or future of comics, keep a very close eye on Off Panel Productions.

3 Responses to “If you liked this comic about usability, you’ll also like…”
Eric Holtz (MS-SMS) at myITforum.com wrote:

Another post about comics: Bug Bash

Eric Holtz (MS-SMS) at myITforum.com wrote:

Another post about comics: Bug Bash

Business Computers wrote:

hei-tecnalia.com

Bug Bash


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Bug Bash is a comic strip written and illustrated by Hans Bjordahl. Bug Bash is a comic strip about technology: managing technology, the business of technology. It's about project management and managing projects through the dull world of Rational Rose, use cases, and requirements. Functional requirements, user requirement, functional specifications, design specifications, call it what you want but it's still the bane of project managers. And when you're done with that, you can think about all the fun that comes with timelines, scheduling, estimates (PERT estimation anyone?) and resourcing until Gantt charts are coming out of your ears. Let's not forget the risk management in the software engineering life cycle. Maintaining the project is just as much fun, managing what was initially set out in requirements and trying to keep feature creep / scope creep in check with change management. If any of these words send nightmares to you, the project manager, then this site probably rings true with you. (Who Links Here?)